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A One of a Kind “Double Arcades” in Downtown Cleveland

17 Jan

I have been to quite many arcades from my traveling. But never have I seen before two parallel arcades being connected together in the middle until I came to Cleveland again. This “H-shaped” tunnel space is very special because each of the two arcades is uniquely designed and the two look totally different from each other. It looks like someone has connected the two arcades that were built in different times, which could be what happened.

5th Street Arcades – 530 Euclid Ave, Cleveland

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The Fascinating Relics of the Old Superior Viaduct in Downtown Cleveland

15 Jan

Walking along the Superior Avenue across the Cuyahoga River, I discovered this mysterious Roman-antiquity-style-looking arched bridges running through the urban fabric. The great span of the giant arches and the sheer size of the bridge are simply engineering wonder. And looking at how this bridge interacts with the roads and building elements surrounding it is a feast to the eyes.

It turns out that this bridge is actually the former viaduct that carries automobiles to the other side of the river. I am so glad that part of it survived after the old bridge was replaced by the Detroit-Superior Bridge that was much higher for boats to pass through.

Old Superior Viaduct – Superior Viaduct “Street”, Cleveland

The “Upcycle Parts Shop” in St. Clair Superior Neighbourhood in Cleveland

14 Jan

This amazing little shop actually is a great example of local creative recycling plus artist studio workshop. You could bring in your excess materials of all kinds for re-sale or adaptive reuse for other artworks. Or you can simply drop in and work on your own projects on the community design table with this very nice cool local artist called David. The friendly atmosphere here welcomes anyone who has something to offer.

I have learned so much about local recycling but have not seen any real example of it that has a bit of creativity involved until I have been to this shop/studio. Thank you David!!

Upcycle Parts Shop – 6419 St Clair Ave, Cleveland

A Very Creative and Green Urinal Room

17 May

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Today I came across the coolest private “pee-only” room I have ever seen. In this little room, this whole system is installed on the back wall. It was shocking to me that the “sink” sits right on top of the “metal urinal”. After you finish your business down in the urinal, when you wash your hands, the water from hand-washing would run directly down to the urinal underneath to “flush” it. Amazing! This is a good design that recycles greywater immediately. I learned something really smart today.

organic tofu desert place and factory at ho sheung heng, sheung shui, hong kong – may 17, 2013

How Would Christopher Wren Have Arranged for Margaret Thatcher’s Funeral?

17 Apr

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photo from http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2013/04/17/world/europe/20130418-THATCHER-7.html

In 1666, the old St Paul’s cathedral in London was severely damaged by the Great Fire. The king’s chief surveyor, Christopher Wren, took this opportunity to build the new St Paul’s which currently stands. Probably inspired by the domes of the Pantheon and the St Peter’s, Wren designed the new cathedral with this mega dome. To present the domed space in its full grandeur, the design of the floor patterns, the altar, the columns and all the niches around the circular space have been specially detailed to work with the dome. The result is that when a person is standing underneath domed space, he can actually feel it, see it and even hear the whisper of the dome.

Looking at this photograph of Margaret Thatcher’s Funeral at the St Paul’s taken underneath the dome, I started to wonder how would Wren have arranged the chairs for this very important ceremony. I am not a hundred percent sure, but my guess is he would have wanted the coffin be placed right underneath the center of the dome which is also the center of the circular floor pattern (the sun). The lines of chairs would have been arranged in a radial pattern, like ripples from the sun. In a way, paying tribute to Margaret Thatcher at her funeral was indirectly paying respect to the old British Empire. The dome has portrayed this empire once the center of the world and on which the sun never sets. Now that I have thought about the meaning of the dome’s center, it got me to think that this strategic and ceremonial spot may probably be reserved for someone even more important than a prime minister. The locations of everything is suddenly justified.

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photo from http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2013/04/17/world/europe/20130418-THATCHER-10.html

st paul’s cathedral, london – apr 17, 2013

Berkley’s Main Street, Block Party and Parade

15 Apr

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Last summer I went to this really cool main street parade in Berkley, a suburb of Detroit. They basically closed off the whole downtown portion of the main street for the Berkley Parade. Although it wasn’t my first time going to a main street festival, when I was watching how these old cars moving from one end to the other, I started to think about how amazing these main streets are for these gridded cities like Berkley.

Unlike cities with piazza or squares, most gridded cities in Michigan have no one single point of focus. Instead they have a long line of main street that joins things together. When compared with a public square, the disadvantage of a main street is that you cannot quite have a big event or festival easily because the main street accommodates both foot and car traffic. I kind of believe that that’s how Americans invented this thing called “block party”. A block party is basically a street getting closed off on its two opposite ends so no car traffic can go through. As a result you can occupy the whole street and use it as a linear piazza temporarily. This is actually very smart because the grid system of the American cities allows you to block off as long a street as you want, depending on your party’s size and need.

If a square or a circular piazza is prefect for a center-focused event like a circus or a music show, a main street would be more suited for a linear type of event that can incorporate the notions of time and movement like a music score. What’s better than a parade for that purpose? Using buildings on main street as a backdrop, parade proudly showcases the community’s achievement all the way from one end of the street to the other other end. Maybe that;s why parades have become so popular in Michigan at least.

I especially liked the Berkley Parade because I was with my best friend, but also I enjoyed seeing the few blocks of Berkley’s Main Street through the sun set. It was an amazing experience particularly at the end when people along the blocks gathered outside the Berkley Theatre for a little music time. The “line” becomes a “dot”.
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berkley parade along twelve mile road by robina ave., berkley, michigan – 7:10pm, aug 18, 2012

Ruins of Luk Keng Village

30 Mar

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Very interesting to know that villagers are eager to pull down the ruins of their hundred-year-old homes to put up completely new three-story concrete villas. Some of the villagers had let the old houses decay on purpose years ago when they left, believing that the villages and/or their descendants would one day come back and rebuild them. Their plan works.

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luk kent village, fanling, hong kong – 4:05pm, mar 29, 2013